Tag Archives: Tea Time with Testers

Please Participate in the Third Annual State of Testing Survey 2016

state of testing
It is that time again for the State of Testing Survey! The first year about 600 people participated and last year it grew to almost 900 Testers! I hope you were one of them. Can you take a few minutes to participate in this important survey? Click here to participate. The survey is sponsored jointly by QA Intelligence – Testing & QA Management blog by PractiTest and Tea-Time with Testers.

The survey seeks to identify the existing characteristics, practices and challenges facing the testing community in hopes to shed light and provoke a fruitful discussion towards improvement. If you are not sure if you want to participate, take a look at last year’s results by clicking here. A lot of valuable information on how other Testers are spending their time, how they plan, methodologies used, challenges faced and much more! I hope you will take some time to complete this valuable survey as I believe you will find the information helpful!

And can you do us a favor? Reblog this posting to let other people know about this survey. Or perhaps you can ask co-workers or friends to complete the survey. Thank you for your consideration.

My Rewarding Experience as a Reviewer and Contributor to “More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team” by Janet Gregory and Lisa Crispin

More Agile Testing
Picture courtesy of Amazon and where you can order this excellent book!

For many years I have written articles for the Testing Community and shared them through Testing Circus and Tea-Time with Testers. One warm summer day in July 2013, I received a pleasant email from Lisa Crispin asking if I would like to be one of the reviewers and contributors to their upcoming book that would compliment their existing book “Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams”. It was an honor to be asked and of course my response confirmed my interest. An international review team was brought together comprising of people with different experiences and expertise in their fields.

This was a rewarding experience both professionally and personally as there were many learning opportunities reviewing the chapters and discussions with the team. Checking my email was fun since there was a potential for an email from Lisa and Janet announcing what was ready for review or from a fellow reviewer with a question to foster a lively discussion. New chapters were quickly printed for when there would be time to review, digest, and comment on them. Lisa and Janet worked with the reviewers to help us identify where we could contribute sidebars to their new book. It was fun reading what the other reviewers were writing based upon their experience. For me, this is what really makes this book come alive – Lisa and Janet are sharing a lot of valuable information that is supplemented by real-life experiences. As an example I enjoyed reading how other Testers are using Session-Based Testing and Thread-Based Testing to meet the challenges of testing in a fast-paced environment!

It was a great opportunity to witness how a book comes together, the chapters under review might not be named nor are they in the order of the final publication. As the book evolved, chapters may be combined or information moved to a different chapter. After reviewing each chapter it was interesting to read the book cover to cover. It reminds me of a movie production where scenes are filmed out of order and then brought together to tell the story.

Once the draft book was completed, there was a great sense of accomplishment and a feeling of disappointment. Being part of a community working towards a common goal is fulfilling and exciting. It reminds me of working with a great project team. When the project is done there is pride of the work completed but yet a sadness that the project is completed.

The information and experiences within this book series is part of the overall testing picture. As an artist blends together different colors and uses different tools to create a beautiful piece of artwork, we do the same in Software Testing. We blend together different approaches and techniques to design and execute testing strategies to tackle complex testing problems.

As with the first Agile book, there are great learning opportunities for you to determine how to apply the information to further your testing career and tackle testing problems. As an example I love the “Pillars of Testing” model by David Evans designed with different factors that integrate to improve our confidence in the information we provide about the Quality of the Product we test. This model helped me think through the different factors to understand our strengths and weaknesses in each area of this model. Adam Knight’s discussion on “T-Shaped Skills” inspired me to think differently about training by identifying the “deeper” skills required for different flavors of technical testing and Product testing. At this time, my background includes limited automated testing experience; however, this book provides a foundation for me to better understand both the benefits and challenges to have a reasonable conversation. The chapter on “Thinking Skills for Testing” is excellent and in particular I like how Sharon Robson discussed that you need to use different type of thinking based upon the problem such as when to use critical thinking, analytical thinking, and creative thinking. Plus sample tools are suggested that can be researched further.

Lastly and most importantly, I would like to thank Janet and Lisa for this wonderful opportunity and to their continual dedication to the Testing Community. My recommendation for my readers is that you will add this book to your testing toolbox and discover how it will influence your testing world!

Articles I Wrote that were Published through Tea-Time With Testers

books

Over the years, I had the pleasure of writing articles and several series for Tea-Time with Testers. My series included: How to Develop a Strategy for Cross-Browser Testing, Career Development and Learning Strategies for Testers and Introducing Session-Based Testing into your Testing department. Below are my articles in their original format. The attachments are in PDF format and you can read a lot of wonderful articles on Tea-Time with Testers.

2013 Articles

Introducing Session-Based Testing to Your Team Part 2 – December 2013 / January 2014
Click here to read
This article is focused on introducing session-based testing in your testing group after attending training.

Introducing Session-Based Testing to Your Team Part 1 – October 2013
Click here to read
This series will discuss how you can use session-based testing and tools like mind maps while providing suggestions on how to implement change within your testing team or department.

Prepare for Promotion Now! – Women in Testing Special September 2013
Click here to read
We often hear how the number of women moving up the corporate ladder becomes smaller at each rung. There are a lot of good conversations discussing the various reasons that factor into this problem. This article is based upon my experience on a few things women can do to let their voices be heard, have more influence, and prepare for senior level positions.

Using Mind Maps to Organize your Cross-Browser Testing Part 5 – February / March 2013
Click here to read
In this part of the series, I shared sample mind maps that I find useful in organizing my testing.

2012 Articles

Balancing Time with Cross-Browser Testing Part 4 – December 2012
Click here to read
In this part of the series, I shared sample mind maps that I find useful in organizing my testing.

Importance of Social Networking Part 3 – August 2012
Click here to read
In this article I shared information I gathered through the Testing Community on how to perform cross-browser testing.

Understanding Browser Compatibility Strategies Part 2 – July 2012
Click here to read
In this article I shared information I gathered through the Testing Community on how to perform cross-browser testing.

Understanding Browser Compatibility Strategies Part 1 – June 2012
Click here to read
In this article I shared information I gathered through the Testing Community on how to perform cross-browser testing.

Contributing to the Testing Community – May 2012
Click here to read
In this article I discussed the importance of building relationships within the Testing Community and contributing.

Training Someone New to Testing Part 2 – April 2012
Click here to read
This series focus on training someone who is new to the Testing field.

Training Someone New to Testing Part 1 – March 2012
Click here to read
This series focus on training someone who is new to the Testing field.

Facilitating a Journal Club – February 2012
Click here to read
In this article I provided suggestions on how to start to start a journal club to provide opportunities for Testers to discuss current trends.

Developing a Career Plan – January 2012
Click here to read
The focus of this article is developing a career plan with approaches that a manager can implement for his department and testers can adopt for their own professional development.

2011 Articles

Onboarding New Testers – November 2011
Click here to read
The focus of this article is onboarding newly hired testers into your department.

Over a Cup of Tea – My Interview with Tea-Time with Testers

Earl Grey Tea and Scones

As I have mentioned in a previous posting, I have a lot of admiration for Lalitkumar Bhamare and I was honored when he asked me for an interview for his excellent e-magazine. His interview provides some insight into my professional and personal life. So grab a cup of tea and perhaps a hot scone to not only read my interview but to also enjoy the wonderful articles written by Testers from around the world! My preference is loose Earl Grey Supreme by Harney and Sons. Speaking of scones… here is a great recipe for scones!

Click here for my interview.

What is Your Legacy – Part 2

I recently attended a women’s conference with the theme “What is your Legacy?” Before I get back to my onboarding new testers series I am writing a few postings on testers who I believe are leaving a legacy in the testing field. It is important to understand that you do not need to be a consultant or own your own business to make a difference. Testers in the trenches can influence change not only in their organizations but also in the testing community. In part one I discussed a few testers that I admire for different reasons. Of course this is an endless list as each of us will admire different leaders. There are many well known leaders such as Cem Kaner, James Bach, Michael Bolton, and many many others. But my focus is more on the testers in the trenches and how they are leaving a legacy that have inspired me! I hope that you realize that everyone can have a legacy. Today I am sharing a few more testers. And think about your legacy – how will you be known – and how are you known presently?

Darren McMillan
I became acquainted with Darren through Twitter and was immediately impressed with his approaches for challenging how testers approach problems. He would tweet asking if anyone was interested in participating in a testing challenge that he was facilitating with his team. Different problems were identified such as “the world could end in 5-minutes” and “testing the future”. Testers would have a time-box to complete the assignment and would provide how they approached the problem, then Darren would meet with them and create a mind map with all the solutions and ideas. You can find his challenges on his website. I have used these challenges as part of my training program as they are a fun way to learn and you will find where you fall into thinking patterns that need to be broken. Plus it shows the power of teamwork over individual, silo testing. As a team we are stronger by bringing together different ways to approach the same problem. I remember when Darren started to blog about using mind maps to write test plans, test ideas, and test cases. It was very interesting to me since it was a lean way to capture information and visually was easy to read. He wrote about mind mapping in Tea-time With Testers and I found an opportunity to use them in test planning and execution. What I witness was testers around the world adopting mind maps as a way to plan and manage the complexities of testing. I don’t know if Darren realized the impact he would have with his blogs and articles but imagine if he did not blog about his ideas with fear they would be rejected.

Michael Larsen
Michael Larsen is an endless supporter of the testing community. He is a Black Box Software Testing (BBST) instructor. BBST is a challenging software testing program that I have not yet attended since it is always filled before I have a chance to enroll. My understanding from Michael and from the BBST website is that it is a blended learning approach using videos lectures, quizzes, different homework assignments, and a final exam. The homework and the exam are peer-reviewed. Every participant in the course reviews work submitted by other participants and provides feedback and suggests grades. What I really like about this approach is that you demonstrate your skills through various activities and at the end of it if you pass the course it really means something! Michael also maintains his own blog with interesting postings from book reviews, software testing techniques, and information on conferences. I love Michael’s book reviews because it has helped me identify books for my testing team. Michael also is a facilitator of Weekend Testing Americas and as the chapter has grown more facilitators have been added. I do admire how much Michael gives of himself to the Testing Community and his own beautiful family.

Elisabeth Hendrickson
Elisabeth has extensive experience as a developer, tester, manager, and quality engineering director in a variety of companies ranging from small startups to multi-national enterprises. You can learn more about her through her Test Obsessed blog. I love her book Explore It! Reduce Risk and Increase Confidence with Exploratory Testing. It is a small book in size but it is packed with valuable information and you only need to read a few pages to be inspired on how you might approach a testing problem differently. This is a great book to be part of your journal club to slowly work through the material to determine how it influences your testing and how you view testing. Take your time and do not rush the reading. Instead read a few pages and let the information sink in before moving on. I also love her book There’s Always a Duck. It is a collection of her postings from blogging and other places she published. It is a great collection of stories and information spanning her 15-years of writing. I love how she brought together this information in an e-book format making it easier to read and locate information. Elisabeth is a gifted writer and both books are important contributions to the testing community as they hold a wealth of information based upon her experiences.

What is your Legacy?

The Gift of Time

Recently at work I made a presentation regarding the Software Testing Department future direction. As part of that presentation I shared stories about a few testers who have made a difference in the field. The next day I attended a women’s conference that was focused around “What is your Legacy?” It was a fabulous conference that gets you thinking about how you live your life today forms how people remember you. It forms your legacy. For this posting, I wanted to share a few testers and leaders who are building or have built a great legacy! I hope one of your take-away from this posting is that you can influence change and make a difference. I bet when some of them started blogging on their ideas they did not imagine the impact!

Gerald Weinberg
Many of my readers will know Gerald Weinberg – many consider him the Father of Software Testing as he formed the first official testing department back in the 1950’s. He has inspired so many technical people through his writing, consulting, mentor-ship, and problem-solving training seminars. This short list does not do him credit for his influence in the tech world. For his 75th birthday a book was written to honor him called The Gift of Time that was written by influential testers and consultants to honor him regarding his contribution to Information Technology and how he influenced their careers. Imagine your legacy living on and people honoring you in such a way on your 75th birthday! Jerry writes for Tea-time with Testers and is involved with the content of the e-magazine and provides regular guidance. You can learn more about Jerry through his website.

Lisa Crispin
I have admired Lisa for many many years and was thrilled when we started to connect through social media. Lisa along with Janet Gregory were influential in helping testers find their voice as part of an agile team. I remember when the agile manifesto came out in 2001 and it was an exciting time since many of us worked in waterfall environments where it quite literally took years to get software to our customers. It was wonderful to hear that software could be delivered in smaller increments. But at the same time there was a buzz that testers were no longer needed on these agile teams. What did that mean for our careers? Were we destined to remain in the waterfall world with heavy documentation and long release cycles? Lisa and Janet both made a difference for us testers by finding our voice! I can only imagine how difficult this must have been since being a change agent is a very difficult role to fulfill. You will make sure that you read their book: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams.

I am honored to be invited as a reviewer for their new agile book coming out later this year. I am inspired by the problems Lisa has tackled and how she freely shares this information to the community. Plus her dedication to travel around the world to speak and train at conferences. She works in my viewpoint, endlessly! You can learn more about Lisa by visiting her website.

Mike Talks

Mike is a wonderful story teller with the ability to view the world as if there is not any boundaries. As a former teacher, he provides a different way to approach testing problems coupled with his degree and knowledge of physics. I find that Mike will challenge your approach on a problem that opens up new avenues that you did not think about. I first “met” Mike through Twitter and his new years posting called: Let 2012 be the death of Superman! You can find that posting here. I used this posting as the starting point for my department’s start of the new year because there is nothing wrong with asking for help or admitting you do not know something. That is why a team approach is typically more effective than a silo approach. Often in the business world we can place too much emphasis on “solo superstars” instead of the integration of the team where you can still highlight your specialty.

Mike is a great mentor and I hope you take some time to get to know him. Mike’s ebook Software Minefield is a great book on his more than 15-years experience as a tester. It is written for experienced testers but there are chapters that are good for a new tester to read. You can learn more about Mike by visiting his website.

Ajay Balamurugadas
In 2009, Ajay was a co-founder of Weekend Testing designed to bring testers together for about 2-hours to test a web-based application focused on a testing charter to further develop their testing skills and knowledge. What I find amazing is this concept spread to Europe, US, and New Zealand. A small group of testers from India influenced testers throughout the world on a different way to progress their skills! I like their catch phrase: Test Learn Contribute. In the Testing Community it is about giving back to the community because we are stronger as a community if we each contribute. Ajay has written several e-books that I am pleased to say that I read before they were published. They are from a viewpoint of a new tester and are packed with a lot of great information! You can learn more about Ajay by visiting his website.

Onboarding New Testers Into Your Department

onboarding

Recruiting and onboarding new testers are two of the more difficult tasks in a Testing department. From a recruitment standpoint you are looking for someone who will be a good fit within the team with the ability to learn how to test your product and any technical skills required. Once you made the hiring decision it is important to develop and evolve an onboarding program. I find that you never create an onboarding program and it is done. Instead it evolves over time and you might need to make minor changes based upon the person you hire and their experience. For example, for someone who has never tested, you will need to provide training on the testing techniques used in your department. If the new tester has experience then you want to ensure you demonstrate how you apply testing techniques since different companies can use terminology to mean something different.

In Tea-time with Testers, I wrote the article “Onboarding New Testers” that you can find in their November 2011 edition. This posting is going to discuss onboarding testers from a slightly different perspective.

When developing your onboarding program, think of it in terms of what do they need to know and when do they need to know it. This can help you define a program that is manageable plus provides some guidelines for expectations. Consider creating a training log with anticipated timelines to help the tester manage his/her time and add self-study tasks to ensure down time is used wisely. For example you might set initial goals for the first 90-days, 6-months, and at 1-year. I will discuss this in more detail in a later posting.

Prior to the new tester starting, be sure his/her workstation is set up, a computer is available, access to the correct systems is approved, and any other appropriate activities are completed. Be sure the new tester knows what time to show up on his/her first day and who to ask for when arriving.

Day 1
The first day is often about the employee completing HR paperwork and reviewing and signing documents such as security policies. The tester should log into email, calendar system, and any other important systems that they need to use immediately. It is helpful to work out any problems the first day with logging into systems, ensuring they can print documents, and other similar tasks. Some companies have a formal HR onboarding program where the employee may or may not have time with his/her new department. I have worked for companies where the morning is dedicated to a company onboarding program and in the afternoon you join your new department.

Week 1
Determine what they should be learning during their first week. For example, this is a good time to pair with another tester to learn the testing process, meet the developers, BAs and other people they will have interaction. Define your goal for the first week and develop a plan around that goal.

Month 1
For each month, define a goal of what they should know by the end of that month and then create a plan around that goal. This goal might be different depending upon the person you hire. During the interview process you want to identify how much testing experience and technical experience the candidate has in order to develop a training plan before their first day. Keep in mind this plan can change based upon how quickly or slowly the new employee learns. You may have to include additional training material once you assess the employee’s learning progress. Or you might find it will not take as long as originally anticipated and you can accelerate the learning process. Remember the onboarding program is an initial plan and it should be a living document.

Of course you will need to follow any Human Resources onboarding program, but they may not have a program specifically to train software testers. This is where you can develop your own program to help integrate the new tester into your team and company.

Get your copy of the State of Testing 2013 — it is hot off the press!!

In a prior posting I invited testers to participate in the State of Testing Survey. This is a unique survey asking testers about the current state of testing such as what approaches, techniques, and tools that they use plus their opinion on the challenges in the testing field. The survey is sponsored by Lalit Bhamare, one of the editors of Tea-time with Testers and Joel Montvelisky co-founders of PractiTest. I do love the collaboration within the world-wide Testing Community – I believe it is a community to be envied because many professionals cannot tap into a similar network.

Today the results was published and you can download the free survey report. I do not want to say too much about the results and take away from their report. However, I am impressed with the number of testers who participated, the information gathered, the layout of results, and brief narrations throughout the report. There is a ton of valuable information and as a Software Testing Manager I will spend some serious time reviewing the results to determine how my team compares to the community and identify opportunities for future endeavors.

So grab a cup of tea and take some time to read this valuable survey. If you did not participate or perhaps did not know about it, there is good news. They plan on conducting the survey on a yearly basis. So near the end of this year I will let you know when you can participate. I would like to thank Lalit and Joel for their dedication of time to create, analyze, and publish this important survey for the Testing Community.

Career planning as a path to promotion – using Mind Maps

career planning steps

In developing a career plan you have many options from creating a formal plan to using tools such as mind maps to organize the skills and knowledge you would like to develop. It is important to have your own plan to ensure you are progressing in your career. In the September 2013 edition of Tea-time With Testers I wrote an article called: Prepare for Promotion Now! It was part of a special edition: Women in Testing. In preparing for a future promotion you need to understand where the company is headed and continue to develop your skills to be ready for future opportunities.

Recently, I was promoted to Director, Quality Management Programs. In this position I will be continue to oversee the strategic direction and leadership of the Software Testing department. In addition I will oversee and implement a quality management system and participate in company-wide quality initiatives and programs. I was in the right place at the right time and over the years I continued my formal education while progressing my skills and knowledge. When I review how my career has progressed over the years it all came together for this promotion fulfilling a new need in the organization. Often sacrifices need to be made to prepare for your future career. When returning to college for my Masters in Strategic Leadership, I went to college full-time and worked full-time. My weeks were about 70-80 hours during this time period. Over the years I continued my professional development through social networking, books, blogs, webinars, and training seminars. Social networking opens up a lot of opportunities for interacting with experts throughout the world regarding different subject matters. Plus I look for new opportunities at work to take on additional responsibility or incorporate what I am learning to how we work. I have never been concerned about working a 40-hour week as I believe we each make life choices on how we use our time.

I tend to have a vision for my life that I discussed in my New Years posting. The below mind map is an example on how you can define your vision, goals, actions, and how you will be accountable. Developing a plan can be easy; however making progress can be difficult. Be sure to identify the gaps in skills and knowledge you are trying to bridge to help with knowing if you are making progress. Then identify a discipline method to review your progress to determine your next steps. You could have a second mind map or just add more nodes to your planning map to document your progress. For example you could add the date when you attended the Rapid Testing Intensive course by James Bach.

Best wishes with your career planning! In future postings I will share other tools for career development. If you want more information on mind mapping see my posting An Introduction to Mind Maps and Testing. See my previous posting on Ideas and Approaches on Developing a Career Plan and if you review my blog you will find more postings on leadership and career development. Plus stay tuned for future postings!!

Career_Plan

Ideas and Approaches on Developing a Career Plan

career plan

The last couple of months I have been discussing different ways to develop your leadership skills and potential. My vision for 2014 is: Make 2014 a year to dream big and make it happen! I would like to share a few ways to develop a career plan using different formats. Similar to a test document, a career plan is a living document – it will change as your skills mature and new opportunities arise. In Tea-time With Testers, January 2012 issue, I wrote an article called: Developing a Career Plan. Refer to this issue to read my original article, as this posting will focus on career development from leadership skills and opportunities. Whereas the article in Tea-time With Testers is focused from both a managerial and employee perspective.

I strongly believe in taking responsibility for developing your career – many managers may not meet with you to develop a plan – do not let this stop you from furthering your career. Some people prefer a formal plan where they define goals, steps, timelines, and milestones. Periodically they revise the plan for progress and any revisions. Others prefer an informal approach where they identify skills and knowledge to improve but not specific steps to meet them. The plan may be documented in a word document, mindmap, or a spreadsheet. Regardless of your approach, the end-result of career planning should be skills and knowledge improvement and not a formal document that requires a lot of maintenance that might not help improve your skills and opportunities. The following sections provide suggestions to get started with developing your leadership plan.

What is my 5-Year Goal?
In order to understand our career aspirations, many start with the question “where do I want to be in 5-years”. This can be a difficult question to answer with evolving technology providing new opportunities. Plus sometimes we are not aware of the potential opportunities leading us down more generic paths such as “I would like to be a better leader”. That is not a bad starting point but challenge yourself to think more deeply about what that statement really means.

A better question might be: how satisfied are you, with where you are at: with your leadership skills? with your leadership opportunities? Additional questions could include:

  1. What do I enjoy most about leading a project? Leading a team? Developing a team?
  2. If you could change something about your leadership style, what would it be?
  3. What project did you feel professional satisfaction, from a leadership perspective, and why?
  4. Based upon what you would change:
  • What skills do you need to improve?
  • What knowledge do you require?
  • What opportunities would be helpful?

How Much Do You Understand About Different Leadership Styles?
To further define learning opportunities, consider the following questions.

  • Whose leadership do I admire that I should spend time studying?
  • Is there a leadership conference that I can attend?
  • If I were to read one book on leadership this year, what book would I read?
  • Who in the company I am employed do I admire for his/her leadership skills? Can I meet with that person to learn more about what makes them a strong leader?

What are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?
Sometimes this is an easy question to answer, as we might be aware of our capabilities and limitations. It can be helpful to create a list of strengths and weaknesses. Review the list of strengths to determine if you are capitalizing upon them. If the answer is no, what needs to change? Identify ways to bring those strengths into your testing. Sometimes a strength can be overused becoming a weakness. Do you have any of those?

Is there a weakness that might hinder career progression? A tester may be capitalizing upon his strengths but the weakness can be reducing promotional potential. For example, if he cannot make a presentation to a management group might make him less influential in the company. Review the list of weaknesses and only work on the ones that can sidetrack a career. Everyone has weaknesses and it is not necessary to improve all of them. Be selective on what strengths and weaknesses you capitalize upon based upon career aspirations.

What Tools Can You Use?
Reflection Journal:
I have found that a journal can be helpful to document what you have learned and areas for improvement. Every night write in the journal a lesson learned and something to do differently. For example, if a difficult conversation with a developer went well, identify why it went well to help you in the future. Perhaps you did more preparation for the meeting or were able to remain calm while discussing the testing results. Periodically review the journal to reflect upon the lessons learned to ensure they are being integrated into the appropriate projects.

Strength-Based Approach:
A strength-based approach, discussed in two popular books, can be adopted that provides both an assessment and program to follow. The book “Now, Discover Your Strengths” by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton, Ph.D. has an Internet-based StrengthsFinder® Profile to identify your top 5 strengths. This book provides a brief overview of the strengths categories and how to use them for personal and professional development. Marcus Buckingham follow-up book “GO Put Your Strengths to Work” provides a short survey to determine how engaged your strengths are being utilized at the beginning and end of the program. A six-step, six-week plan helps a tester identify approaches to incorporate strengths into the workweek and manage weaknesses that may be damaging.

Career Plan:
A career plan can include information such as goals, milestones, skill-gaps, knowledge-gaps, and training needs. In a later posting I will be sharing a format of a career plan that you can adopt and modify for your own needs.

How Can You Measure Progress?
It is important to periodically review a career plan to understand progression toward the goals and to determine if any corrective action is necessary. A career plan should be a living document that evolves with developing skills.

In future postings I will share different formats on how you might document and manage your career plan. Let me know how you develop your skills; whether you have a formal plan or capitalize upon opportunities as they arise.